Hexagram Thirteen—Fellowship

Hexagram Thirteen shows the natural state of fire below and sky above. The people in a small town are peaceful when they are not influenced by the self-centered attitudes of the city. Being fixed in this attitude is a good time to begin new projects.

The first line, yang, shows the representative of the people coming to the gate. This person greets others as equals and makes no distinctions of family, race, or gender.

The second line, yang, shows a person respecting only their own family. This attitude will bring shame and regret.

The third line, yang, shows that prejudice is impotent, like a general who keeps his soldiers hiding in the bushes and ready on the hillside without attacking.

The fourth line, yang, indicates good fortune if a prejudice person can give up the desire to attack people who are different.

The fifth line, yin, shows a compassionate person who is aggrieved by injustice and prejudice. This person uses strength and humor to bring people together.

The sixth line, yang, shows the representative of the people working in the outskirts of the town. Working together on an equal footing, people in society make progress in life.


Hexagram Thirteen Commentary

This hexagram shows people living the old fashioned way in a small town. This lifestyle suggests nostalgia for a time when people were "not influenced by the self-centered attitudes of the city." In a peaceful state of mind like this, good things can happen.

The first line, yang, shows a leader who treats everyone equally. Longing for a time when everyone feels like they belong and they are respected is at the heart of the nostalgia people feel for life in a small town.

The second line, yang, shows a person who only respects his or her own family. This is a shame and will lead to regret.

The third line, yang, calls prejudice "impotent" and compares it to "a general who keeps his soldiers hiding in the bushes and ready on the hillside without attacking." This is a shame because he could have done so much more if only he could have opened up his mind.

The fourth line, yang, says the cure for prejudice is when the prejudiced person "can give up the desire to attack people who are different." This is not as easy as it sounds, since bigoted attitudes are deeply engrained.

The fifth line, yin, recommends those of us who are "aggrieved by injustice and prejudice" speak up. It is possible to bring people together through "strength and humor." This gets back to the concept of humor "punching up." Comedians speak for the ordinary people unhappy with the leaders, and we see this in our world today. It may be risky for a serious pundit to contradict racist leaders. However, comedians do it all the time and get away with it. This concept is universal and goes back centuries to the court jester, who was often the only person who could offer an honest critique to a ruler.

The sixth line, yang, shows the leader working side-by-side with the people. The hexagram concludes, "Working together on an equal footing, people in society make progress in life."





To the reader: Most of the hexagrams have at least one line that predicts bad results, but that does NOT mean you are fated to that result. The hexagrams illustrate different attitudes, so study the actions and reactions to learn the attitudes that will lead to better outcomes.

The I Ching teaches you to flow with changes and create positive change from the inside through conscious living. Your future is in your hands. Consult the I Ching for ideas that lead to clear thinking and positive mental attitude. Reading the I Ching helps you take the time to reflect on your attitudes and ideas. Continue asking until you feel positive about your course.

To ask again - click here.






A note about this interpretation of the I Ching: Nori Muster wrote this version of the iChing in 1994 and put it online at Surrealist.org in 2000. It is now available as an e-book. Click here to see Learning to Flow with the Dao at Amazon.com..


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